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Who We Are

The Northern Río Grande National Heritage Area is a significant component of the national story. The area of northern New Mexico that comprises the Heritage Area carries its own history and course of occupation that is distinct from that of the rest of the country and the rest of the Southwest. This history preceded the formation of the United States, including an indigenous revolution against the dominant power - the Pueblo Revolt of 1680 - which left its imprint in the cultural heritage that remains in northern New Mexico and in its people.

New Mexico is a land of Native cultures and Hispanic settlements. In its people, customs, languages, and forms of law, the territories and settlements within this foreign land named Nuevo Mexico were broadly different. The history and heritage of northern New Mexico was folded into the history of the United States through the incidence of military conquest. Through this sudden change of events, a land and a people once separate became melded into the national portrait and landscape.

The interaction of cultures and the retention of unique cultural attributes remain at the core of the experience of northern New Mexico. This serves as an exemplar of cultural accommodation and of the value of diversity in the national composite.

NORTHERN RIO GRANDE NATIONAL HERITAGE AREA, INC.

With the creation of the National Heritage Area, the enabling legislation established that there should be a "Management Entity" to plan then carry out the purposes of the Heritage Area. Northern Río Grande National Heritage Area, Inc. (NRGNHA) is a New Mexico non-profit organization designated to serve as the management entity. The mission of the NRGNHA is to help sustain the communities, languages, cultures, traditions, heritage and environment of Northern New Mexico.

The NRGNHA Board of Directors includes one representative from each of the eight pueblos and the Jicarilla Apache, one representative from each of the three county governments, one from each of the main municipal communities (Santa Fe, Taos, and Española), one representative from the State government, and nine community representatives from throughout the Heritage Area. This broad-based composition permits the Board to fully represent the interests and cultural differences within the entire Heritage Area.

See our Staff and Board